Dignity in care

Group of Residents and Staff in the Nursing Servery Celebrating Dignity Action Day 2012
Group of Residents and Staff in the Nursing Servery Celebrating Dignity Action Day 2012

Maintaining dignity is an important part of care delivery, and something we see as fundamental to how we work with our residents day-to-day.

Christine Carlton from Nursing Care is our Dignity Champion.  She represents us at the local Dignity in Care forum, acting as the link between Blind Veterans UK and other local organisations.  The purpose of the forum is to communicate issues around dignity and share ideas about best practice.

The Dignity in Care campaign was launched in 2009 to highlight the issue nationally, and create a care system which doesn't tolerate abuse or disrespect. The government leads the campaign in partnership with organisations that provide and commission care, to protect the interests of people who use care services.

What is Dignity in Care?

The Dignity in Care campaign centres on the 10 point Dignity Challenge, which highlights that care services can respect people's dignity can be recognised by meeting the following criteria:

  • Have a zero tolerance of all forms of abuse
  • Treat people with the same respect you would want for yourself or a member of your family
  • Treat each person as an individual by offering a personalised service
  • Enable people to maintain the maximum possible level of independence, choice and control
  • Listen and support people to express their needs and wants
  • Respect people's right to privacy
  • Ensure people feel able to complain without fear of retribution
  • Engage with family members and carers as care partners
  • Assist people to maintain confidence and a positive self-esteem
  • Act to alleviate people's loneliness and isolation

 

More information about Dignity in Care can be found here

"It might well be that the difference people make individually is a mere ripple on the surface of our care system, but each of those ripples added together create a wave, a social movement, and if this makes life better for some - then it has to be worthwhile."

Sir Michael Parkinson, Dignity Champion

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